What Can I Give My Cat For Arthritis?

The poor kitties. Arthritis in cats is the perfect storm: a disease that manages to be severe, unseen, unresearched and very common all at the same time.

How common is it? Numbers vary but one study found it in 90% of cats over 12 and another in 82% over 14. Even if only half of these need treatment, we aren’t seeing anything like that in our clinics. Why?

  1. Most owners don’t recognise it: I’ll show you later what to look for but it’s not obvious
  2. Vets are even worse at spotting it: one study found our odds no better than a coin toss
  3. Very little research has been done: only three treatments have been evaluated
  4. Fear of side effects stops vets treating cats adequately: more on this later

Let’s start with a spotter’s guide to this most tricky of diagnoses.

Symptoms Of Arthritis In Cats

Signs are mostly vague and behavioural and can be just one of the following:

  • Reduced jumping height or ability
  • Reluctance to use stairs
  • More time spent resting
  • Objection to handling
  • Reduced interaction with people
  • Changes in mood
  • Changes in litter box use
  • Less play or hunting
  • Changes in resting areas
  • A poorly groomed coat
  • Posture change

Strikingly, what we almost never see are limping or crying out.

If you feel your cat is showing some of these signs, see your vet, but don’t feel too guilty. You can read how I lived with my cat for years before I realised she was in pain.

Diagnosis Of Feline Arthritis

Now it’s going to get controversial and personal. I’ll start by telling you how I won’t decide if a cat has arthritis.

I won’t trust my ability to find it by examination. Studies show that this is a poor way to identify arthritis in cats. Of course, if I do find it that’s fine.

I won’t necessarily schedule X-rays. Studies also show a poor correlation between radiographic changes and actual pain.

What I will do is ask you about your cat’s lifestyle. It’s the little clues at home that tell us the most.

Then, if I suspect that your cat is in pain, I’ll recommend a short treatment trial. It’s possibly the only way to ask a cat how they feel. If they get better, you actually know something better than if they have arthritis. You know how to help.

But treatment trials come with a strong warning.

Beware The Placebo Effect

Visit our page on knowing which pet medications work and you’ll see a study on arthritis treatment in cats. It showed that cat owners were unable to tell the difference between real and ‘caregiver placebo’ effects during a treatment trial.

If we don’t recognise the problem, many cats will end up on unnecessary drugs. There are two ways to combat this unconscious bias:

  1. One answer is found in the study: the placebo effect didn’t occur in reverse. Owners were correctly able to identify affected cats worsening when the trial ended.
  2. The other answer is simple: by warning you about a bias, you can fight it. If you read how I tested my cat, I didn’t tell the family so I could ask if they saw anything. They certainly did!

Cat Arthritis Treatments

I’ll do my best to be as open-minded as I can but I’m also going to be blunt about where the evidence doesn’t sit. Using an ineffective treatment is not just useless, it gets in the way of using something else that might actually work.

Arthritis Supplements & Home Remedies

There are many natural options for pain in cats but none have been proven to work. Based on our knowledge of arthritis in dogs (far better studied) it’s likely that fish oil and green lipped mussel products will have some benefit. However, as safe as it is, that benefit is likely to be insufficient so let’s move on.

Cat Arthritis Diets

Hills feline j/d is a diet formulated specifically as a joint treatment. It contains several natural remedies which in combination have been shown to improve signs of arthritis in cats. The only time I don’t recommend j/d is in cats sensitive to changing their food.

Cat Arthritis Injections

Cartrophen, Zydax, Synovan, and Arthropen are all brands of pentosan polysulfate sodium. It’s only registered for dogs but most vets agree that it is also effective in cats. Although ‘off label’ it appears almost completely free of side effects.

Four injections are given at weekly intervals.

Cat Anti Inflammatory Drugs

The biggest mistake I see is cat owners and vets worrying so much about non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) side effects that they won’t use them. Once your cat needs pain relief, these drugs are lifesavers and nearly always very safe if closely monitored.

dog pain pyramid
The picture is from a pain management lecture I attended in the UK. It shows the relative importance of different drugs in controlling pain in dogs. Note that paracetamol is extremely dangerous to cats.

There are only two cat NSAIDs to choose from. We use mostly meloxicam for its combination of efficacy, safety, price and ease of use. Robenacoxib is a palatable tablet that may be more effective and is a realistic second option for us.

When side effects occur they are mainly vomiting and diarrhoea due to gastrointestinal ulcers. If this happens, a pause or change in medication is required. Liver or kidney damage can occur but should be rare if blood testing is performed before, and then again shortly after starting. We even find that cats with existing kidney disease can safely go on meloxicam as long as they are closely monitored.

Prednisolone and other cortisone drugs are also anti-inflammatory but should definitely be avoided unless there’s no alternative. They do not work well and cause serious side effects at the doses that are needed.

Other Pain Relief Drugs

Tramadol and gabapentin can be used as second-line pain treatments. Neither is likely to work as well as an anti-inflammatory but they may help in patients unable to take them. It’s important to state that there is no evidence for their efficacy and they only come as tablets or capsules unless reformulated via compounding.

Buprenorphine is an opioid that appears very safe and effective for all types of pain in cats. The problem is that it only comes as an injection with very strict legal controls. We do use it for cats but reserve it for special needs.

If used carefully, the only common side effects of all three drugs are mild sedation when given at higher doses.

Other Remedies

Lastly, we should never overlook other ways of treating arthritis. First among these is weight loss. For advice on weight loss in cats click here.

Second in importance are the home care ways to assist cats in pain. Keeping old cats warm via bed warmers or extra rugs seems to help a little. Their litter, food, water and bedding need to be moved to where they can be accessed easily. They may also need help with grooming to prevent a matted coat.

I have much less experience with physical therapy, acupuncture, chiropractic, cold laser treatments or other alternative remedies. I fear, however, that these will cause more stress than benefit.

If you want to dive deeper, visit our page on the causes of arthritis.

Have something to add? Comments are welcome below and will appear within 24 hours of lodging.


By Andrew Spanner BVSc(Hons) MVetStud, a vet in Adelaide, Australia. These help topics are from a series regularly posted on Facebook and Twitter. The information provided here is not intended to be used as a substitute for going to the vet. If your pet is unwell, please seek veterinary attention.

Andrew

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